Posts Tagged ‘pesticide harm’

Knowledge Is Power

November 3, 2013
GMO and You
We’re at a tipping point in the fight to label GMOs and prevent the overuse of their toxic herbicides. We need you to join us in the march to victory!

View and share our new video Demon Weeds! It’s the story of glyphosate-resistant weeds, a GMO herbicide, and the negative effects on the environment and human health.

It’s more important than ever for you to take action! Increased use of GMO crops is causing the herbicide glyphosate (an ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup) to be used in massive amounts. ANH-USA’s newest report shows that increased use of glyphosate can damage our environment, our economy, the livelihood of American farmers, and especially our health.

You deserve to know what’s in your food, and what kind of farming practices your purchases support. Take action now!

  • View and share our new video Demon Weeds!
  • Visit www.ANH-USA.org/gmo to take action and view our reports. They will give you the real information about GMOs you deserve.

Please take action todaythere’s no time to lose.  Our health depends on it. 

Pesticides in Food Proven to be Dangerous

December 14, 2012

Now for many of us, this seems to be a no-brainer. Any chemical residue on our food (or in our homes from using bug killer chemicals) is going to have some kind of probably negative impact on our health. Common sense says, if there is an “impurity”(something we haven’t coevolved with), it most likely isn’t really safe.

Bad for adult brains, too. On the heels of last week’s strong report from pediatricians  highlighting the harms pesticides can cause children’s developing  minds, a new study finds that pesticides are clearly harming adult  brains, too.

In the “meta-analysis” published in Critical Reviews in Toxicology,  scientists reviewed 14 separate studies of neurobehavioral changes  linked to low-level organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure. They found  that workers exposed to OPs — particularly over long periods of time —  had reduced working memory and were slower to process information.Read more »